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Stranger, What Brings You to Coconino? - Anniversaries

TheOldMole
Jun 20 2005 09:09 AM

On June 20, 1910, Krazy Kat made its debut in the New York Journal.

TheOldMole
Jun 20 2005 09:15 AM

Is there a limit to characters in thread titles? I had wanted to make that "Anniversaries Worth Celebrating."

Edgy DC
Jun 20 2005 09:16 AM

Guess so. Your point is clear though.

Willets Point
Jun 20 2005 09:21 AM

Krazy Kat is damn funny. I need to find a book of George Herriman's works.

TheOldMole
Jun 20 2005 10:12 AM

And the late paintings of the great contemporary artist Philip Guston were strongly influenced by Herriman.

TheOldMole
Jun 23 2005 11:38 AM

On this day in 1993, Lorena Bobbitt...well, you know the rest.

MFS62
Jun 23 2005 12:46 PM

Shudder.

Later

TheOldMole
Jul 05 2005 01:52 PM

On this day in 1942, the Special 25 spy-training school in Port Hope, Ontario, produces its first graduate... Ian Fleming.

Edgy DC
Jul 05 2005 03:39 PM

And the late paintings of the great contemporary artist Philip Guston were strongly influenced by Herriman.

How did the paintings die?

TheOldMole
Jul 05 2005 07:26 PM

No, that's not as ungrammatical as it sounds.

The paintings from late in his career.

Edgy DC
Jul 08 2005 06:27 AM

Fifty years ago, a novelty hit called "Rock Around the Clock" went to number one.

TheOldMole
Aug 05 2005 08:26 AM

We should drink a toast to this. On this day in 1693, Dom Perignon invented champagne,

TheOldMole
Aug 09 2005 10:33 AM

Today is the 75th anniversary of the first appearance of Betty Boop.


and the 45th anniversary of Timothy Leary's first trip on psilocybin mushrooms.



Which is the more psychedelic experience?

TheOldMole
Aug 15 2005 07:27 PM

On this day in 1965 - The Beatles at Shea.

And in 1969, I came upon a child of God....

TheOldMole
Oct 07 2005 10:53 AM

On this day in 1955, Allen Ginsberg changed the face of American literature when he performed "Howl" in public for the first time, at a poetry reading in San Francisco.

ScarletKnight41
Oct 07 2005 12:01 PM

On this day in 2000 Benny Agbayani hit that extra innings home run against the Giants at Shea :)

Benjamin Grimm
Oct 07 2005 12:03 PM

Really! That means it was five years ago tonight that my daughter was conceived!

ScarletKnight41
Oct 07 2005 12:15 PM

Um, that's TMI...

Benjamin Grimm
Oct 07 2005 12:39 PM

I'm sure I've shared that here before.

Edgy DC
Oct 07 2005 12:45 PM

Sure he has.

I've got no problem with knowing when people... you know.

Even if they're posting while they're at it.

My life is boring enough as it is.

You go, Thing. You just be you.

TheOldMole
Oct 08 2005 12:21 AM

Posting while they're at it?

NYMutt
Oct 08 2005 12:49 AM

I'm probably going to open up a can of worms with this one:

On this day, in 1789, Rachel Wall was hanged for highway robbery. She was the first woman to be executed in America.

NYMutt
Oct 08 2005 12:50 AM

I'm probably going to open up a can of worms with this one:

On this day, in 1789, Rachel Wall was hanged for highway robbery. She was the first woman to be executed in America.

Johnny Dickshot
Oct 08 2005 10:24 AM

Worst part was they never even recovered the highway.

Willets Point
Oct 08 2005 10:27 AM

Must mean the first woman executed in an independent US because I know of several executions of women in colonial 17th & 18th century America.

Frayed Knot
Oct 18 2005 10:14 PM

I saw something today that it was the anniversary of one of the more remarkable athletic feats:

October 18th, 1968 -- Mexico City





Bob Beamon was a 22 year-old New Yorker working without a formal coach when - as a long jumper in the Summer Olympics (it was held in October due to the Mexican heat) - the phrase "Beamon-esque" came into the sports lexicon as a description of something freakishly amazing.

The long jump - being a basic and ancient event that requires no fancy equipment and one that kids everywhere try at least on an informal level at some point - has generally had it's records increased by inches or fractions of inches at a time. By 1968 the record stood just shy of 27 and a half ft and hadn't moved a whole lot since Jesse Owens was dominating at the event during the 1930s. Beamon had made the U.S. team on his final try at a qualifying event and was virtually unknown at the time.
In his first jump (a jumper takes the best of 6 attempts) Beamon seemed to float over the pit for what observers thought had a chance at being the first 28' jump in history. Having only competed in U.S.-based college track, Beamon was unfamiliar with the internationally used metric distances and couldn't decipher the distance when the results were first posted. He then had to almost be carried off the track after it was translated to him that the 8.9 meter mark is the equivalent of 29 ft - 2-1/2 inches and he had broken the world record by almost 2 feet (21 inches).
Mexico City's nearly 10,000 ft altitude is often cited as a factor, although the silver medal jump that day was 28 inches shorter than Beamon's leap. His record stood for nearly 25 years and in the 37 years since has still been bettered (I believe) just once, and only by 2 inches.

I can't think of any other event that had such an out of nowhere leap forward (no pun intended) of it's optimal standard.
Just for kicks some time try pacing off a few inches shy of 30 ft in your house, yard or driveway and get a load of how ridiculous that distance is.

Edgy DC
Oct 18 2005 11:12 PM

Well, there's Babe Ruth breaking Ned Williamson's big-league home run record (27 in 1884) by hitting 29 in 1919 and then turning around and hitting 54 in 1920. That's still something.

TheOldMole
Oct 30 2005 01:41 PM

THis is the centennial of both Einstein's theory of relativity and Freud's theory of the vaginal orgasm.

TheOldMole
Nov 02 2005 11:36 PM

...and of pizza.

Benjamin Grimm
Nov 03 2005 07:04 AM

Wow, pizza and orgasms. That's a one-two that's hard to beat.

Centerfield
Nov 03 2005 10:44 AM

Yeah, unless beer and nipples were invented on the same day, I think we can pretty much close the polls.

Edgy DC
Nov 04 2005 09:56 PM

One year ago today, the Mets hired Willie Randolph to manage the team.

MFS62
Nov 05 2005 12:03 PM

Edgy DC wrote:
One year ago today, the Mets hired Willie Randolph to manage the team.


And on many baseball boards, the comparison between Randolph and Einstein has been endlessly discussed ever since. :)


Later

Willets Point
Nov 09 2005 09:36 AM

Here's something that makes me feel old: there's not teenager alive today who remembers the Berlin Wall as something other than an historical fact. It's demolition began on this date in 1989.

Benjamin Grimm
Nov 13 2005 11:00 AM

On November 13, Felix Unger was asked to remove himself from his place of residence.

That request came from his wife.

Frayed Knot
Nov 15 2005 08:19 PM

It was thrity years ago today ...






Well, not today exactly (I think the record was released in October sometime) but the 3 decade release is being celebrated today with new releases with all sorts of remasters and bonus tracks and DVDs (and assorted whatnot).


The release of a record like that must have turned that 24 year old's life upside down at least 15 different ways.

Valadius
Nov 15 2005 08:33 PM

I VAGUELY remember the Berlin Wall coming down. I DO remember when the Soviet Union broke up.

seawolf17
Nov 18 2005 10:50 AM



One year later, Ron Artest is still a certified wackadoo.

Frayed Knot
Nov 22 2005 11:53 AM

42 years

TheOldMole
Dec 07 2005 10:18 PM

John Lennon, 25 years.

I made a vow on that day, assumimg this awful deed was done for some warped kind of publicity, that I wau;d never participate in it or support it. And I've held to that, to this day. Any story that mentions the murderer's name, I turn off.

Johnny Dickshot
Dec 08 2005 06:05 AM

I was in Junior High. I was just waking up and vaguely aware the radio was playing Beatles songs when my sister came in all hysterical to tell me. I felt worse for her since she was nuts about the Beatles.

cooby
Dec 08 2005 06:07 AM

I was at my Uncle Bob's viewing when I found out, so since it was evening, I guess I found out pretty much immediately. I have associated the two men's deaths ever since.

ScarletKnight41
Dec 08 2005 06:20 AM

I was in college. I was watching the news, and heard that John Lennon was shot. During the night I dreamed that he was dead, although it's highly possible that I was just hearing people talking outside my dorm room door. The next morning when I woke up, Imagine was on the radio, and then came the confirmation that he had died.

seawolf17
Dec 08 2005 06:22 AM

I was 4.

Edgy DC
Dec 08 2005 08:15 AM
Edited 1 time(s), most recently on Dec 08 2005 12:00 PM

I remember seeing misguided folks camped outside the Dakota calling to Yoko, asking her to bring Sean to the window. It was clear that peeps' relationship with Lennon and his music had a religious element --- and this certainly balooned upon his martyrdom. I was probably so affected as much as many. But that was a freaky spectacle for my junior high eyes.

I read once that the head of the emergency room team who treated Lennon, immediately after they quit the revival effort, had the presence of mind to tell the staff to destroy all the tools they used in the attempted revival, lest they become macabre collectors items.

I think about this when I see those baseball cards with a a quarter inch of material from a player's jersey.

Even as a Catholic, I find the venerating of relics a strange and mysterious thing. When I see it spill over into the secular world, it gets disturbing.

TheOldMole
Dec 08 2005 11:56 AM

]I read once that the head of the emergency room team who treated Lennon, immediately after they quit the revival effort, had the presence of mind to tell the staff to destroy all the tools they used in the attempted revival, lest they become macabre collectors items.


Good for him.

Benjamin Grimm
Dec 08 2005 12:24 PM

TheOldMole wrote:
]I read once that the head of the emergency room team who treated Lennon, immediately after they quit the revival effort, had the presence of mind to tell the staff to destroy all the tools they used in the attempted revival, lest they become macabre collectors items.


Good for him.


He was interviewed in a Daily News article just yesterday. He mentioned that bit about destroying equipment and blood-stained clothing. The fact that that occurred to him almost twenty years before eBay is pretty impressive.

Willets Point
Jan 06 2006 01:08 PM

January 6, 1941 - President Roosevelt makes his four freedoms speech before Congress.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt wrote:
The first is freedom of speech and expression --everywhere
in the world.

The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his
own way-- everywhere in the world.

The third is freedom from want, which, translated into world
terms, means economic understandings which will secure to
every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants
--everywhere in the world.

The fourth is freedom from fear, which, translated into
world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to
such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation
will be in a position to commit an act of physical
aggression against any neighbor --anywhere in the wold.
That is no vision of a distant millennium. It is a definite
basis for a kind of world attainable in our own time and
generation. That kind of world is the very antithesis of
the so-called "new order" of tyranny which the dictators
seek to create with the crash of a bomb.


Full text.

Bret Sabermetric
Jan 06 2006 02:10 PM

Yancy Street Gang wrote:
="TheOldMole"]
]I read once that the head of the emergency room team who treated Lennon, immediately after they quit the revival effort, had the presence of mind to tell the staff to destroy all the tools they used in the attempted revival, lest they become macabre collectors items.


Good for him.


He was interviewed in a Daily News article just yesterday. He mentioned that bit about destroying equipment and blood-stained clothing. The fact that that occurred to him almost twenty years before eBay is pretty impressive.


Very sharp. Imagine how much the scalpel he hung on to is worth today.

sharpie
Jan 06 2006 02:15 PM

I wasn't CPFing on December 8 (which was both the 25th anniversary of John Lennon's death and the 5 year anniversary of my father's death). On 12/8/80 I was stage managing a show in Los Angeles and had to drive to the airport to pick up an actor. I heard about Lennon on the radio driving to the airport. Still haunts me.

Giant Squidlike Creature
Feb 23 2006 10:46 AM

This is a good thread to bump up for the anniversary of Mets By the Numbers and the Ultimate Mets Database.

Feb. 23 is also the anniversary of Woody Guthrie writing "This Land is Your Land" (1940) and the raising of the US flag on Iwo Jima (1945).

cooby
Feb 23 2006 11:22 AM

That song seems older than that